Grounding

So I am guessing many of you out there have heard the words ‘grounding techniques’. Do you know what people mean when they use the word grounding? Do you know any grounding techniques? Do you know how to use them? If the answer is yes then that is wonderful. But for those who might not answer yes to all the above questions or who may like a refresher then here is a brief answer to each question

Do you know what people mean when they use the word grounding?

When we (therapists) use the words grounding techniques we are talking about brief and simple tasks or activities that are designed to help people manage or cope with strong emotional responses to previous experiences, thoughts or trauma’s that are connected to strong negative emotions. People often feels these manifested as anxiety, flashbacks, and panic attacks.

Do you know any grounding techniques? Do you know how to use them?

Here is a list of some very basic and short grounding techniques that you may like to try they shouldn’t take more than one or two minutes. As with all therapy skills practise makes perfect and the more a technique is practised/repeated the better the outcome is each time, so please don’t be disheartened if the initial relief is not as good as you had hoped. If the technique is not offering the relief you hoped please do try another as we are all individuals and different techniques may work better for some than others.

  1. Stand up, rock gently from side to side or walk around – focus on the physical experience.
  2. Touch objects near to you, focus on the sensory input.
  3. In a safe space remove shoes and socks and feel your feet against the ground, really focus on the sensory inputs.
  4. Look at the seconds hand on a clock, focus on the sound of it ticking, count with it as it ticks.
  5. Recite your times tables, try to recall the lyrics to a song, recall the words to a favourite poem, solve a maths problem.
  6. Notice what is good right now – look around for a positive. (sometimes you can set a reminder on your phone to do this periodically throughout the day)
  7. Focus on your body and a tension spot, now focus on something around you that is calm or relaxing, keep switching between the two for about 30 seconds to 1 minute, end by focusing on the external calm spot

For more details about these techniques and some more in-depth ways to help reduce anxiety and negative emotional experiences or you’d like video, telephone or face to face counselling in the Stoke-on-Trent, Newcastle-under-Lyme or Staffordshire area please do contact Wright Minds at laura@wrightminds.co.uk or on 07598810304